DON’T BE A TOSSER, ROOCYCLE YOUR RUBBISH

As the temperatures climb and rubbish creeps back to our shores, Deliveroo’s Roocycle Your Rubbish initiative returns. The food delivery company is committed to keeping seaside spaces litter free and feels compelled to do its part once more.

Over the next three weekends, Deliveroo will be at five UK beaches to keep ’em clean as Brits flock to the shores for a summer holiday staycation. First launched in 2018, a similar campaign celebrated the arrival of Deliveroo at nearly 100 beach and coastal locations. This time round, the brand is responding to a different need – the need for clean. As families are forced to make the most of UK sunshine due to Covid-19 travel restrictions, they’ve headed to the beaches, and the litter has come with them.

As Brits resign themselves to a summer at home, the search term ‘UK holiday’ has soared up 103% compared to this time last year. A recent study has also revealed that 66% of us are interested in booking a holiday in the UK this year due to the coronavirus pandemic2.

The UK hit 33 degrees last month and a reported1 11 tonnes of litter was picked up from Brighton beach with similar stories all over the country. In a bid to decrease these shocking figures, beach goers will be handed buckets to collect rubbish, which can then be swapped for Deliveroo credit! The campaign is supported by Clean Up Britain.

As one of the worst hit beaches in the UK, Brighton was the first visited by the Roocyclers last Friday. Next they’ll be in Southend, followed by Edinburgh and Blackpool. The full Roocycling schedule is:

 

  • Brighton (24th July)
  • Bournemouth (25th July)
  • Southend Seafront (30th July)
  • Edinburgh (1st August)
  • Blackpool (1st August)

 

In 2018 Deliveroo became the first food delivery company to require customers to opt-in to receive plastic cutlery with their meals. This has drastically reduced the number of meals being delivered with cutlery – fewer than 10% of meals ordered now have this. This global feature means millions of pieces of single-use plastic are being saved each year, meaning that less end up on shores.