Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy

From Matisse to Hockney and even Jay-Z, the influence of Pablo Picasso is undeniable and has cemented his genius as one of, if not the greatest artists of the 20th century. The justification of the hype surrounding the recent exhibition at the Tate Modern is well earned.

Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy is a month by month journey through Picasso’s ‘year of wonder’. Now I would say that you don’t have to be into art to appreciate this exhibition. The fantastic pieces of work on display all have an intriguing human story behind them worthy of a series on Netflix or HBO. In 1932, Picasso was 50 and simply put a proper baller. He dressed in Saville Row suits, married to a Russian ballerina, was driven around by a chauffeur, lived in an awesome apartment in the centre of Paris and had a 22 year old secret over, who was also his muse.

Pablo Picasso, ‘The Dream’. 1932. Oil on canvas.

The Tate has done a great job of dividing the rooms in months so it makes it easy for non hardcore art lovers to appreciate some truly beautiful artworks on display, such as ‘Rest’ and ‘Woman Sleeping’. with over 100 pieces on display, it’s not hard to be overwhelmed by Picasso’s work you are introduced to 2 or even 3 pieces of art painted in a single day. The paintings of Marie-Thérèse Walter, his mistress are in particular very erotically charged as can be seen in ‘The Dream’.

I love a good quote and there are many by Picasso throughout the exhibition which actually helps you to inderstand him a little more. One in particular is ‘The work that one does is a way of keeping a diary’. It’s hard to argue with the words of one of the most prolific artists in recent history.

As I mentioned before, even if you’re not into art this exhibition is still a great one to see, it makes a perfect one for a date. However if you are an art lover, this exhibition is definitely not one to be missed.

• Picasso 1932: Love, Fame, Tragedy is at Tate Modern, London, from 8 March to 9 September 2018.

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